You Don’t Want To Mess With Jinri The Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Artist

You Don’t Want To Mess With Jinri The Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Artist

This month’s cover girl, Jinri Park, could really kick some serious butt.

In her magazine interview, the Korean celebrity has opened up about the impact of Brazilian jiu-jitsu on her frame of mind.

“[Jiu-jitsu] has changed the way I view my life because it teaches you to be very humble,” she explains. “The martial art recognizes that there’s always going to be someone better than you and who will beat you even if you’re very experienced. I get this unexplainable fulfillment out of it.”

And unlike other BJJ hipsters who only get into the discipline for style points, Jinri isn’t just all talk. She has the moves to back up her game. 

The July 2017 muse was recently promoted to blue belt, but not before winning three gold, one silver, and two bronze medals of her own. Not bad for someone who only started out in November of 2015.

We already feel sorry for those who, in any way, want to mess with Jinri.

Even a dark alley becomes a safe place for the bemedalled grappler!


More from FHM.com.ph

Looks like she has a lot more in common with her character on Encantadia:

We’re up for a BJJ lesson, as long as Jinri is our mentor:

Kicking ass is just one of the things she preoccupies herself with these days. Grab a copy of the July issue to learn more about her other passions!

FHM July 2017, which comes with the 100 Sexiest Women in the World supplement, is available in supermarkets, convenience stores, newsstands, and bookstores nationwide!

You can score digital copies through the FHM app on Apple App Store (http://bit.ly/fhmphapple) and on Google Play (http://bit.ly/FhmPHandroid), Buqo, and the Summit Media Newsstand(http://bit.ly/fhmmagph)!

 

via You Don’t Want To Mess With Jinri The Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Artist

 

15 Lies That Everyone Who Does Jiu-Jitsu Will Eventually Tell

15 Lies That Everyone Who Does Jiu-Jitsu Will Eventually Tell


Photo Source: Issys Calderon Photography/ Instagram

The mats may not lie, but the people rolling on them definitely do. We jiu-jitsu practitioners might appear to be more honest than many folks, but don’t be fooled: we fib to our teammates, our spouses, our doctors, and especially ourselves. If you haven’t let all of these white lies roll off your tongue yet, I can guarantee it’s only a matter of time before you do.

“Sure, doc. I can avoid training for a few weeks. I’ll definitely last longer than two days before the itch to drill that cool new move overwhelms me and I end up putting my gi on again. I totally take my injury as seriously as I should, and you can rest assured I won’t be finding creative ways to train without hurting myself even worse.”

“That was my foot squeaking against the mat. What, you really think I couldn’t take a knee-on-belly without farting? No, I don’t smell anything. Why?”

“I can afford that new gi. I know I just blew a bunch of money on tournament entry fees and promised myself they’d be the last jiu-jitsu-related expenses I’d be making for a while, but it’s limited edition, and one of my gis looks like it might tear soon, and who needs food and electricity anyway, right?”

“I love takedowns. Number-one takedown fan, that’s me. You’ll never catch this kid pulling guard or doing the butt-scootin’ boogie, no sir.”

“Just one more video and then I’m going to bed. I can be trusted to stay away from the ‘related’ videos on the sidebar, even though they look like they’d complement this technique perfectly. I also don’t need to know the counter to this move, and I certainly have no desire to see five variations of it.”

“I’m only going to class tonight to watch. I’ve trained every day for the past ten days, and I know my body needs to rest. I refuse to be swayed by my teammates or the promise of a cool new technique.”

“You bet your sweet cinnamon buns I’m ready for that tournament in three days. Sure, I’m ten pounds heavier than the weight class I want to be in, but I can starve myself for 48 hours and cry out all the extra water weight.”

“Let’s just go light this round. I’m feeling pretty tired, and I swear I injured my left nostril yesterday. You can trust that I won’t suddenly decide to go 110 percent while you’re rolling at 40 percent.”

“I’m sitting this one out because I’m tired. It’s not because I’m pretty sure your gi has never seen the inside of a washing machine and I’m worried I’ll vomit if I roll with you.”

“Just try one class and I’ll never bother you about it again. You’ll never hear me try to convince you how amazing jiu-jitsu is. I’ll stop sending you articles about how jiu-jitsu changes lives. I’ll never again do that thing where I say I’m driving you to the bar but actually end up driving us to the gym.”

“Of course I love you more than jiu-jitsu, babe. If I had to choose between you or jiu-jitsu, there’s a 100 percent chance I would pick you. Okay, maybe 90 percent. 75 percent. Definitely at least a 50 percent chance I’d pick you.”

“I’m fine. It’s just a flesh wound. Possibly a tendon wound. My elbow is always swollen and purple. I could bend it if I wanted to.”

“I was not an embarrassing fangirl/boy at that seminar. Sure, the instructor is basically the Michael Jordan of jiu-jitsu, and sure, I’ve watched all his videos and liked all his Instagram posts and stayed up at ungodly hours just to watch the live streams of his tournament matches, but I’m pretty casual. I only hyperventilated when he complimented my triangle defense because this gym doesn’t have good air circulation.”

“I let him have that submission. What, you think that I, a powerful purple belt, would ever tap to the armbar of a lowly white belt? Pah! I was merely boosting his confidence. Now excuse me, I have to go to the bathroom to pee and not question my entire jiu-jitsu career while crying.”

“Got it. This technique is forever etched into the crinkles of my brain. My teammates merely adopted it, but I was born into it, molded by it. I will not need a personal step-by-step demonstration the moment I pair off with my partner and realized I forgot the whole thing in ten seconds.”

via 15 Lies That Everyone Who Does Jiu-Jitsu Will Eventually Tell

 

Flexibility Secrets For Jiu-Jitsu By Ryan Hall

Properly warming-up and stretching your muscles is important before any kind of workout, including all forms of martial arts. The same stretching exercises you do before a practice session are the answer to how to increase your flexibility for Jiu Jitsu, whether you are in a tournament, or just keeping your skills sharp in the dojo.

Improving flexibility involves doing sustained stretches of all major muscle groups, one at a time. The order you do these stretches in is not as important as making sure you give enough time to each muscle group. This is the secret of how to increase your flexibility for Jiu Jitsu, as well as any other physical activity.

via Flexibility Secrets For Jiu-Jitsu By Ryan Hall

 

Flexibility Secrets For Jiu-Jitsu By Ryan Hall

Properly warming-up and stretching your muscles is important before any kind of workout, including all forms of martial arts. The same stretching exercises you do before a practice session are the answer to how to increase your flexibility for Jiu Jitsu, whether you are in a tournament, or just keeping your skills sharp in the dojo.

Improving flexibility involves doing sustained stretches of all major muscle groups, one at a time. The order you do these stretches in is not as important as making sure you give enough time to each muscle group. This is the secret of how to increase your flexibility for Jiu Jitsu, as well as any other physical activity.

via Flexibility Secrets For Jiu-Jitsu By Ryan Hall

 

Jiu-Jitsu Parents: This is for you.

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If you’re a parent of a child in Jiujitsu, it is obvious you want your child to do well and succeed. That is a normal expectation. However, there is a line that you need to be aware of. This line separates the healthy, supportive parents from the overbearing, slightly psychotic parents that push their kids too far. You want to make sure your child actually enjoys participating in the sport, so it is highly important that you make sure you support them in a healthy way so that they grow and learn in a positive environment. Here are some ways you can do just that:

1. Stop screaming at competitions– Parents, it is okay to cheer your child on! In fact, it is great, but please don’t shout things such as “break his arm!” or “kill him!” Sadly enough, I have heard these types of phrases yelled towards children and it makes me feel very unsettled. These are not grown adults in a real street fight. These are young, influential children participating in a sport that is actually supposed to teach them respect. You may think you sound normal, but in all honesty you’re probably getting a lot of looks from people who are wondering why you would yell such an absurd statement to a child. If you’re going to cheer a child on, use positive phrases and encouragement.

2. Stop thinking your child’s performance is reflective of your parenting- Every child is different. How he/ she performs does not reflect on you, so stop thinking that. Children participating in a sport is a way for them to self-discover. It is for them to see what they like, what they dislike, and what they’re good at. If they lose a match, or don’t perform a drill well, that certainly does not reflect on you as a parent. This is their chance to learn and grow as a person.

3. Don’t live through your child– Don’t be that parent that lives vicariously through their child. Not only is it selfish, but you’re not genuinely caring about your child’s performance. All you really are doing is trying to live out a washed out dream that you once had, through them. In no way is that healthy. This is not about you, so always remember what your child’s wants and needs are as well.

4. Don’t get mad- So your child loses a match? Please, do NOT yell at them. Do not look down on them. You should only be providing encouraging phrases, and uplifting words of advice. Yelling at the child and making them feel like they did something wrong will eventually ruin the sport for them along with their self-confidence. Always provide your child with unconditional love. Also, maybe they don’t even care if they lost or didn’t do something well. Please do not say things like “well you SHOULD care.” You are only instilling the concept that winning is all that matters, and that is the last thing you should do.

5. Don’t interfere with the coach- This is simple. Whether it’s practice or competition what the coach says, goes. As a parent, I am sure you feel entitled, but the coach is the coach of this specific sport for a reason. If we’re going to be honest here, basically the coach knows more than you do. Don’t make your child feel conflicted, by saying things that go against what their coach says.

6. Be a role model for your child- This should be a given. Be someone your child looks up to. You set the pace for them right from the beginning. Be nothing but positive and supportive so they can see what a healthy environment looks like. Eventually your children will grow up and have children of their own, and they will teach their kids the way they were taught. Always think about your actions and the affects they may have down the road.

7. Always encourage, but don’t be pushy- Be encouraging. Go to practices and competitions. Listen to your child when they express their needs. If they need a day off, let them have it. Don’t compete with other parents; that only causes tension within the gym. Constructive criticism is okay, but keep it constructive and always give praise when deserved.

I hope parents out there understand the role they play in their child’s growth process. Sports are great for children. They help them to grow and develop a vast amount of great values and qualities. It is your job to create the healthy environment for your child to get the most they can out of it!

via Jiu-Jitsu Parents: This is for you.

 

Jiu-Jitsu Parents: This is for you.

Share this:

If you’re a parent of a child in Jiujitsu, it is obvious you want your child to do well and succeed. That is a normal expectation. However, there is a line that you need to be aware of. This line separates the healthy, supportive parents from the overbearing, slightly psychotic parents that push their kids too far. You want to make sure your child actually enjoys participating in the sport, so it is highly important that you make sure you support them in a healthy way so that they grow and learn in a positive environment. Here are some ways you can do just that:

1. Stop screaming at competitions– Parents, it is okay to cheer your child on! In fact, it is great, but please don’t shout things such as “break his arm!” or “kill him!” Sadly enough, I have heard these types of phrases yelled towards children and it makes me feel very unsettled. These are not grown adults in a real street fight. These are young, influential children participating in a sport that is actually supposed to teach them respect. You may think you sound normal, but in all honesty you’re probably getting a lot of looks from people who are wondering why you would yell such an absurd statement to a child. If you’re going to cheer a child on, use positive phrases and encouragement.

2. Stop thinking your child’s performance is reflective of your parenting- Every child is different. How he/ she performs does not reflect on you, so stop thinking that. Children participating in a sport is a way for them to self-discover. It is for them to see what they like, what they dislike, and what they’re good at. If they lose a match, or don’t perform a drill well, that certainly does not reflect on you as a parent. This is their chance to learn and grow as a person.

3. Don’t live through your child– Don’t be that parent that lives vicariously through their child. Not only is it selfish, but you’re not genuinely caring about your child’s performance. All you really are doing is trying to live out a washed out dream that you once had, through them. In no way is that healthy. This is not about you, so always remember what your child’s wants and needs are as well.

4. Don’t get mad- So your child loses a match? Please, do NOT yell at them. Do not look down on them. You should only be providing encouraging phrases, and uplifting words of advice. Yelling at the child and making them feel like they did something wrong will eventually ruin the sport for them along with their self-confidence. Always provide your child with unconditional love. Also, maybe they don’t even care if they lost or didn’t do something well. Please do not say things like “well you SHOULD care.” You are only instilling the concept that winning is all that matters, and that is the last thing you should do.

5. Don’t interfere with the coach- This is simple. Whether it’s practice or competition what the coach says, goes. As a parent, I am sure you feel entitled, but the coach is the coach of this specific sport for a reason. If we’re going to be honest here, basically the coach knows more than you do. Don’t make your child feel conflicted, by saying things that go against what their coach says.

6. Be a role model for your child- This should be a given. Be someone your child looks up to. You set the pace for them right from the beginning. Be nothing but positive and supportive so they can see what a healthy environment looks like. Eventually your children will grow up and have children of their own, and they will teach their kids the way they were taught. Always think about your actions and the affects they may have down the road.

7. Always encourage, but don’t be pushy- Be encouraging. Go to practices and competitions. Listen to your child when they express their needs. If they need a day off, let them have it. Don’t compete with other parents; that only causes tension within the gym. Constructive criticism is okay, but keep it constructive and always give praise when deserved.

I hope parents out there understand the role they play in their child’s growth process. Sports are great for children. They help them to grow and develop a vast amount of great values and qualities. It is your job to create the healthy environment for your child to get the most they can out of it!

via Jiu-Jitsu Parents: This is for you.